Sunday, June 30, 2013

What To See: Venice Biennale 2013

Every two years, Venice becomes the center of the art world as the city gears up to hold one of its grandest exhibitions. The bi-yearly ehibit, or Biennale turns the city into a rendez-vous for artists, critics, collectors, and journalists from all over the world. Some of the most fabulous globe trotters attend the notorious exhibit each year.
 
The doors to this year’s Biennale opened to the public on June 1st. The main exhibit, Il Palazzo Enciclopedico del Mondo (The Encyclopedic Palace of the World), features over 150 artists from 38 different countries. The inspiration came from American artist, Marino Auriti.
 88 countries, including the Vatican are represented in this year’s event. Separated into their individual sections or “pavillions”, several ideas materialized from the displays of contemporary art.
A number of themes collide at the Biennale. Inspiration for the art derive from themes of greed, speculation, surrealism; the city itself served as a background for many of the installations. An incredible diversity emerged from the amalgamation of so many different ideas.
Through an extremely wide array of media, and seemingly endless forms on creativity and artistic expression, the Biennale delivers a diverse and striking collection of contemporary art.
The Biennale is an incredible offering of artistic brilliance. It is a display of several art forms that feel almost alive. Spectators find that just by viewing an installation, they have made themselves part of the exhibit, making the Biennale an interactive experience between the art and its viewer.
During the Biennale, the city of Venice becomes a backdrop for much of the art. Just by exploring the city, any tourist will run into some form of contemporary art. 
To experience the Biennale, is to experience the city. The Venetian setting paired with contemporary art creates a wonderful tension between classical roots, and modern thinking. 
Imagine, walking out your front door, or making your way to work, and your morning commute passes through an exhibit that the whole world wants to see. With Venice serving as it’s floor, the Biennale turns the city into what could be the largest interactive gallery in the world.
An interesting installation features actress, Mila Jovovich in a small glass house. This statement where fashion meets art drew quite the media attention. 
At the American Pavilion, Boston born artist, Sarsah Sze interjects a calculated chaos through a collection of “found” objects into a classical setting with her installation, Triple Point.

Sze used both interior and exterior spaces for her installation. From the “observatory’s” (interior) view, a glass wall visually integrates her inside and outside work, while simultaneously physically separating her spaces.

The Italian Pavilion, curated by Bartolomeo Pietromarchi, presents “a journey of Italian art today” as represented through themes of landscape, architecture, and history.

The curator describes the installation as: “A portrait of recent art, read as an atlas of themes and attitudes in dialogue with the historical legacy and current affairs, with both a local and international dimension.”

 “A cross-dialogue of correspondences, derivations and differences between acclaimed maestros and artists of later generations.”

 
 “An unusual topography, that permits a reevaluation of some basic trajectories in recent Italian art, a retracing of forgotten paths, the healing of cultural amnesia and gives new visibility to solitary authors.”

This year, the French installation finds itself in what is traditionally the German Pavilion’s space. The exchange of the German and French pavilions is part of an agreement marking the fiftieth anniversary of the Elysée Treaty and celebrating Franco-German friendship.

The title of the piece is a subtle play on words based on the verb to ravel and its opposite, to unravel, as well as a reference to the famous French composer Maurice Ravel.
Occupying the central space of the German Pavilion, the first of two works, entitled Ravel Ravel, consists of two films, each focused on the left hand of a famous pianist: Louis Lortie and Jean-Efflam Bavouzet. Both of these performers were invited by Anri Sala to perform Ravel’s Concerto, accompanied by the Orchestre National de France.

At the centre of Anri Sala’s project is the interpretation of the same piece of music by these two musicians. As the artist explains “each film is focused on the choreography of the left hand encompassing the entirety of the keyboard, while the right hand remains still.”
In the adjacent rooms, two other films are presented under the single title Unravel. Chloe, a DJ, is filmed alone, mixing each of the two interpretations and trying to unite the two versions of the Concerto through her unique interpretation. In these films, Anri Sala continues his exploration of space and sound, as well as the silent language of the body. 
 
The Biennale will be open to the public until November 24 2013. If you find yourself in Venice between now and then, make sure you check out this incredible exhibit. 

Visit us at jeanmarcfray.com/ to browse our beautiful selection of Venetian and Murano lighting, vintage Italian finds, and fine French antiques.

to presentsvice versa, an ideal journey through Italian art of today, an itinerary that tells of identities, history and landscapes – real and imaginary – exploring the complexity and layers that characterize the country’s artistic vicissitudes. – See more at: http://moussemagazine.it/italian-pavillion-55-biennale/#sthash.CjMVAjyg.dpuf
presentsvice versa, an ideal journey through Italian art of today, an itinerary that tells of identities, history and landscapes – real and imaginary – exploring the complexity and layers that characterize the country’s artistic vicissitudes. – See more at: http://moussemagazine.it/italian-pavillion-55-biennale/#sthash.CjMVAjyg.dpuf
presentsvice versa, an ideal journey through Italian art of today, an itinerary that tells of identities, history and landscapes – real and imaginary – exploring the complexity and layers that characterize the country’s artistic vicissitudes. – See more at: http://moussemagazine.it/italian-pavillion-55-biennale/#sthash.CjMVAjyg.dpuf
Bartolomeo Pietromarchi
Posted by Jean-Marc Fray French Antiques at 04:24:00 PM
Links to this post
Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Pick of the Week: Vintage Italian Brass Bar Cart

Vintage Italian Brass and Glass Bar Cart

 

 

 The impeccable condition of this bar cart makes it hard to believe that it’s over half a century old. Circa 1940, Italian, with a perfect patina, this piece is irresistibly gorgeous. With two glass surfaces, there is plenty of room for everything. Each tray is removable. Happy Hour never looked so good!


Posted by Jean-Marc Fray French Antiques at 08:48:00 PM
Links to this post
Back